Mathematics of Information seminar. CS286, 2010-11

A concern with logical and statistical quantities --- information --- is central to science and engineering. The pertinent mathematics is being actively developed in disciplines such as algorithms, complexity, communications, control, quantum mechanics, economics, probability, combinatorics, algebra and harmonic analysis. This seminar is devoted to synthesis of methods across disciplines. Participants will give short lecture series on techniques and current questions in specific areas.

Instructor: Schulman
Prerequisites: Coursework in some of the relevant fields at the first-year graduate level.
Course sponsored by the CMI
The lectures this year will be given mostly by postdocs, faculty and visitors.


Fall 2010, CS286a
Credit: 3 units P/F
Times: Tuesdays 4:00-5:30 in Annenberg 213, with tea
First meeting: November 9

Speaker schedule:
Nov 9 Daniel Golovin –
Adaptive Submodularity: A New Approach to Active Learning and Stochastic Optimization

Nov 16 Andreas Krause – Gaussian Process Optimization in the Bandit Setting: No Regret and Experimental Design

Nov 30 Sachin Adlakha – Large Population Stochastic Dynamic Games (Part 1)

Dec 7 Sachin Adlakha – Large Population Stochastic Dynamic Games (Part 2)

 


Winter 2010, CS286a
Credit: 3 units P/F
Times: Tuesdays 4:00-5:30 in Annenberg 213, with tea
First meeting: January 18

Speaker schedule:
Jan 18 Libin Jiang –
A distributed algorithm to achieve the maximal throughput and utility in

wireless networks (Part 1)

Jan 25 Libin Jiang – A distributed algorithm to achieve the maximal throughput and utility in

wireless networks (Part 2)

Feb 8 Krishna Jagannathan - Scheduling in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic:

Throughput Optimality and Queue Length Asymptotics

Feb 15 Krishna Jagannathan - Scheduling in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic:

Throughput Optimality and Queue Length Asymptotics

Mar 2 Anup Rao (U Washington) - Towards Coding for Maximum Errors in Interactive Communication

Mar 16 Venkatesan Guruswami (CMU) - Bridging Shannon and Hamming: Codes for Computationally
Simple Channels

 


Last year's seminar